Economic

Milepost
8.10

In the early 1930’s, the W.P.A. dredged this channel between Ossawinamakee (Ojibwe for ‘Long Lake’) and Pelican Lake. It was the “dust bowl” years and Pelican Lake was drying up.

Milepost
8.70

Developed in 1939, the construction of the resort was financed by a Salem, NE, banker who, according to lore, actually came up to “this remote part of Minnesota” and pounded a few nails himself.

Milepost
9.20

The public water access to Pelican Lake is one of the few remaining undeveloped areas around Pelican Lake. The area is a designated loon nesting area.

Milepost
9.30

This tranquil (.8 mile in) setting was once called Beacon Heights and catered to Christian families that were also members of a group called the Red Sea Mission.

Milepost
9.30

Built on land purchased from the railroad in 1934, Boyd Lodge had 8 cabins by the late 30's. During the 40's and 50's, a mink farm occupied the area that is now the tennis courts.

Milepost
9.60

Begun in the 1930’s, this quiet location is still to this day a haven for the harried.

Milepost
10.40

Originally a family farm, it’s still easy to pick out the location that was once a crop field, now a green space recreation area.

Milepost
10.90

To accomplish the task of laying a road between the many wetlands and lakes in the area, a system of dikes was developed by the Corps of Engineers.

Milepost
11.40

Once a corrugated metal building that had long since outlived its usefulness, the idea was hatched to transform it into a restaurant/bar and marine gas station.

Milepost
11.40

Originally built out of simple timbers, this important bridge was moved and later restructured to comply with new road standards.

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